Tag Archives: Review

Let’s Review: The Crucible

By Nim
Teen Advisory Group President


the-crucible

I’m back! It’s time for another edition of “AP English III Novel Reviews”, with your host, Nim! Let’s get started.

AAAAAHHHLOOKATTHECUTIEEEEE

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Let’s Review: A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas


It’s been awhile since I finished A Court of Mist and Fury and it’s still on my mind. It’s been months (!) and I’m still thinking about it. A lot of authors (especially in the young adult genre) make the romance aspect of their story so predictable. Not Sarah J. Maas though! She threw plot twist after plot twist in this story that my head is still reeling after all of it.

^^ my face throughout the whole entire book

Even though this book is categorized as “young adult”, I would consider it more as a new adult series. There are some sexy times that aren’t censored like most young adult novels. Beware.

One thing I love about this series is the character development. You start off thinking you understand each and every character in A Court of Thorns and Roses. Then you read A Court of Mist and Fury and then you realize that all the things you found holy were a lie because the author decided to throw in some important backstory. Like most people after a major event, the characters change, hence the character development. Each story gives a little more insight into who each character is. A wise ogre once told me, “[People] are like onions. [People] have layers. Onions have layers. You get it? We both have layers.” It’s exactly like that. Every book is like peeling another layer of each character.

If you like finding new OTPs (One True Pairing), then you’d really like this series. There are many couples that I can help but (silently) squeal whenever I think about them because I love them so much. There were some times where I squealed out loud in public when I thought about my OTPs and I’ve gotten some strange looks. It’s okay though. It’s totally worth it.

I find that whenever I read young adult/new adult romance novels, I don’t like the female character because she acts like a damsel in distress all the time. Like, honey, that boy won’t help you unless you help yourself first. Then, in other times, the female is unnaturally emotionally strong. I mean that girl won’t even blink an eye if a puppy was kicked. What will it take to get you to feel sad? Thankfully, that’s not the case with Feyre (the main female protagonist). She’s strong, but she’s also human. She’s feels emotion, dang it, but she doesn’t act weak.

Overall, I liked the story because it was fast-paced and intense. It was like I was on a roller coaster the whole time. There were times where I had to set down the book to wrap my mind around what happened.

If you like fantasy romance novels that are filled with action, heart break, and hot guys, you’ll definitely enjoy A Court of Mist and Fury. My only suggestion is to start with the first book, obviously.

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Let’s Review: Frederick Douglass

Next up in English III novels is a fairly short read in the autobiography Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by you guessed it, Frederick Douglass. Published in 1845, it captures the plight of slaves during this time. Beaten, raped, killed, and separated from their families, some slaves such as Douglass resolved to escape in search for freedom. Douglass finally succeeded after failed attempts and moved North where he became a free man. His childhood was marked by unimaginable sufferings but he reminds us that other slaves had it much worse which hints at the true horrors of slavery.

Douglass also explains ways how white masters kept slaves subservient, and among them is lack of access to education. Realizing this, young Douglass taught himself to read and write with the help of neighborhood white boys who sympathized with his situation. He also exposes the hypocrisy of white slave owners: they profess their faith to God yet own fellow human beings. Religion was much debated during this time as many whites used the Bible to justify slavery; however, Douglass disproves this and supports his anti-slavery argument not only using religion but also logic and morals.

It was definitely meaningful and inspiring to read the story of such an incredible individual who overcame his barriers as a slave and established himself as an advocate for other suffering slaves like he had been. It is no understatement to say that the works of people like Douglass contributed to the 13th amendment abolishing slavery, and I am happy to say that Mr. Douglass lived to see this day in 1865.

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Let’s Review: The Scarlet Letter

Second on the list of English III literature is The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Hawthorne was on good terms with transcendentalists such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, but was a critic of the movement himself and held more pessimistic views on human nature. An interesting fact about Hawthorne’s ancestral lineage is that he was a descendant of John Hathorne, a leading voice in the Salem Witch Trials (and a minor character in The Crucible) and one of the only judges to never apologize for his actions sentencing “witches” to death. He was the reason Nathaniel Hawthorne decided to add a “w” to hide their relation, and The Scarlet Letter is seen as Hawthorne’s apology in his ancestor’s stead.

The novel is set in 17th century Boston, still a largely Puritan society. In the town lives young and beautiful Hester Prynne, who in the beginning of the novel is revealed to have committed adultery and is condemned by her entire community. Her punishment is wearing a scarlet “A” on her chest for the rest of her life and become an outcast in her Puritan society. She and her daughter, Pearl, live on the outskirts of town and learn to live in their own way. These two, especially Pearl, represent non-conformists to Puritan society. However, Hester’s kindness and good works ultimately lead to some respect and higher regards for her in the community. I won’t reveal the entire storyline here, but there are two men in Hester’s complicated love life: her former husband known as Roger Chillingworth and the reverend Dimmesdale. Both are inherently non-evil people, but both suffer from pain caused by sin, guilt, or revenge. The story of these two men and Hester and Pearl in this strictly Puritan society makes this novel a fairly enjoyable and interesting read (for an English class novel at least) and serves to highlight Hawthorne’s dislike and contempt for the hypocrisy of Puritan ideals that had caused the Salem Witch Trials during his ancestor’s time.

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Unplugged: Love Letter

The library has a variety of games to play and one of my favorites is Love Letter. This game was designed by Seiji Kanai and has pretty simple rules to follow.  There are eight kinds of Love letter but the one we have is the Tempest edition.

In this game you are trying to woo the heart of Princess Annette, but after her mother’s death she has locked herself in the palace and your only way of giving her your love letter is through others in the palace. To play, there is a set of 16 cards, each representing a different person in the castle. Only one card is in  your hand when it is not your turn, and that is who has your love letter. In order to win a token of the princess’s affection, you need to have the person closest to her with your love letter. Simple, right? Except each card does something different when discarded.

To know more, click here for the complete rules or go play the game yourself at the library on April 30 for International Tabletop Day.

 

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Doombringer presents: Legendary Marvel

d635cbab0876d05938d276f80e0416ffMy name is Abel Kim, a board game, card game, and League of Legends/Hearthstone/Overwatch freak. In honor of International Tabletop day on April 30, I will be talking about some of the games that I am planning on bringing to the table.

In today’s review I will be talking about the first board game I ever got: Legendary Marvel. Firsly, here is my origin story: I was scrolling down Youtube when I saw Markiplier’s face in the picture of a Tabletop video for Legendary Marvel. I clicked the video to see the magnificent Warfstache but was instead entertained by the antics of the guest stars and the host Wil Wheaton (who was btw an actor in Star Trek and Leverage and who knows what else). Here is a link to the video that inspired me to buy the game: “Maria is love. Maria is life.” -fake Markiplier quote 2015

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Let’s Review: The Weight of Feathers

 

weight

Isn’t that such an interesting cover? Too bad the story inside wasn’t as great. Because I’m trying to blog all of the books I read for the Hub Challenge (in the spirit of The Weight of Feathers, número tres es completa/numéro trois est terminée. Thanks, Google Translate.), I’m posting about a book I didn’t particularly care for. But…

I’m old, so if you get that reference, good on you! Check the book out for yourself. It’s a 2016 finalist for the Morris Award for debut authors. Click below to see my full review (copied from my Goodreads because I’m lazy like that).

♥ Heather, Youth Services Librarian

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Reel Talk: Pride and Prejudice and Zombies

Please someone mention the pun I just made.

Pride-and-Prejudice-and-Zombies-Movie-Poster

I got the wonderful opportunity to see this two weeks before the release (shoutout to the Nerdfighters at UNT for hooking us up), and let me tell you… there are spoilers ahead.

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Let’s Review: The Vault of Dreamers

❥Storyline: The Forge School is the most prestigious arts school in the country. The secret to its success:  every moment of the students’ lives is televised as part of the insanely popular Forge Show, and the students’ schedule includes twelve hours of induced sleep meant to enhance creativity. But when first year student Rosie Sinclair skips her sleeping pill, she discovers there is something off about Forge. In fact, she suspects that there are sinister things going on deep below the reaches of the cameras in the school. What’s worse is, she starts to notice that the edges of her consciousness do not feel quite right. And soon, she unearths the ghastly secret that the Forge School is hiding—and what it truly means to dream there. (Goodreads) Continue reading

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Let’s Review: Girl Online

❥Storyline: Girl Online follows a 15-year-old blogger who travels on a surprise trip to New York City with her family. While there she meets a boy who changes her life. She can’t stop thinking about him, and for the few weeks that she’s there they’re inseparable. Everything’s going fine, but what she doesn’t expect is for this boy to have a secret and for this secret to threaten not only her blogging life, but her personal life too. Continue reading

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